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Written by Amanda Turner    Friday, 19 January 2018 08:05    PDF Print
Wieber, Too: Michigan Gymnast Confronts Nassar as Fourth Member of 'Fierce Five' to Suffer Sexual Abus
(9 votes, average 3.89 out of 5)



World and Olympic gold medalist Jordyn Wieber made a stunning appearance Friday morning in the sentencing hearing of former USA Gymnastics doctor Larry Nassar entered its fourth day in an Ingham County, Michigan courtroom. Pictured: A disappointed Jordyn Wieber cries following the qualification competition at the 2012 Olympic Games in London, where she was suffering from a stress fracture in her right leg and did not advance to the all-around final.

World and Olympic gold medalist Jordyn Wieber made a stunning appearance Friday morning in the courtroom as the sentencing hearing of former USA Gymnastics doctor Larry Nassar entered its fourth day in Lansing, Michigan. Wieber, who grew up in nearby DeWitt, is the fourth member of the "Fierce Five," the 2012 U.S. Olympic gold medal-winning squad, to come forward as a survivor of depraved sexual abuse committed at the hands of the once trusted team doctor.

With teammate Aly Raisman looking on, Wieber took a deep breath and confirmed she had not escaped the abuse Nassar afflicted on so many other gymnasts and athletes over at least 25 years.

"I thought that training for the Olympics would be hardest thing I would ever have to do," Wieber said. "But the hardest thing I've ever had to do is process that I'm a victim of Larry Nassar. It has caused me to feel shame and confusion and I have spent months trying to look back and wonder how I didn't even know this was happening to me, how I became so brainwashed by Larry and everyone at USA Gymnastics, both whom I thought were on my side. He became a safe person, and was the 'good guy' in an intense, restricting environment."


Jordyn Wieber at the 2006 U.S. junior championships

Wieber, the most decorated gymnast to ever come out of Michigan, returned home to join a parade of women delivering devastating victim's impact statements in the sentencing hearing of Nassar, a serial pedophile who preyed on vulnerable girls and women by sexually assaulting them, nearly all using methods he described as "treatment" to help injured back, hip, pelvic and hails from nearby DeWitt. Nassar pleaded guilty last November as part of plea deal that saw him prosecuted for only 10 assaults, seven of which occurred in Ingham County, home of his former employer, Michigan State University.

The sheer number of survivors of Nassar's abuse has been difficult to track, with more than 150 women reportedly alleging abuse over at least 25 years. As part of his plea deal, he agreed to allow any woman whom he had assaulted to deliver a victim impact statement at his sentencing hearing. The number of women who requested was up to 104, it was announced Thursday by the assistan attorney general.

One of those was Wieber, whose appearance Friday was a closely guarded secret. When news of allegations against Nassar first made headlines in September 2016, Wieber's mother, Rita Wieber, defended Nassar.

"Larry was always very professional in treating Jordyn throughout the years," Rita Wieber told the Detroit Free Press 15 months ago.

An emotional Wieber largely ignored Nassar, who has been sitting in the witness box next to the judge, as she explained how he began sexually abusing her following a torn hamstring she suffered when she was 14. Like many others, she had trusted that Nassar, whom she knew from age 8, was performing legitimate medical treatment on her, which he inflicted "time after time, appointment after appointment."

Wieber, who will turn 24 in July, trained at Geddert's Twisters USA Gym in Lansing throughout her career. She won the world all-around title in 2011 in Tokyo, where she was part of the U.S. women's gold medal team. She also won the American Cup titles in 2009 and 2011. At the 2012 Olympic Games in London, she was hampered by a stress fracture in her right leg and failed to advance to the all-around final because of the two-per country rule, but helped the American women, dubbed the "Fierce Five," win their first Olympic team title outside the United States. She finished seventh on floor in the final.

Wieber said she discussed Nassar's "treatment" with her teammates, who were also uncomfortable with it, but that they were too afraid that challenging him or complaining would keep them off the Olympic team. Now she is struggling with the revelation that she was actually being sexually abused by a man entrusted to help her with her injuries as she pursued her dream of competing in the Olympics.

"Was Larry even doing anything to help my pain?" she asked. "Was I getting the proper medical care? What was he thinking about when he massaged my sore muscles every day? Now, I question everything."

Wieber slammed USA Gymnastics as well as the U.S. Olympic Committee for allowing a pedophile to prey on young girls who were overtrained, deprived food and frightened. Nassar was the only man allowed to be alone in the gymnasts' rooms at the Karolyi ranch and in hotel rooms, including the Olympic Village, a violation of basic policies for both organizations.

"Larry Nassar is accountable," Wieber said. "USA Gymnastics is accountable. The U.S. Olympic Committee is accountable. (USA Gymnastics') lack of accountability has caused me and many other girls to remain shameful, confused and disappointed. My teammates and friends have been through enough and now it's time for change. The current and future gymnasts do not deserve to live in anxiety, fear and being unprotected like I was."

Wieber turned professional prior to the 2012 Olympics and thus was not eligible to compete in the NCAA. Still, she was active with the women's team at UCLA, where she worked as a student coach alongside Val Kondos Fields and Chris Waller. She trained separately from the team, but elected to retire rather than continue elite competition. Last June, she graduated from UCLA with a degree in psychology.

Nassar was the team doctor at Twistars Gymnastics and Geddert's previous gym, Great Lakes Gymnastics, where he victimized gymnasts for decades. Many have spoken up this past week to accuse Nassar of grooming them by acting as their protector in what they allege was a psychologically and physically abusive environment. This week, ESPN's Outside the Lines and a local television network alleged that Geddert was one of Nassar's main enablers and that he had been reported both to the police and USA Gymnastics for violent behavior.

Nassar maintained his innocence until last November, when he pleaded guilty and admitted his supposed treatment was in fact done for his own gratification. He has already been sentenced to 60 years in federal prison for charges related to child pornography. Wieber also stated that Nassar obsessively photographed the gymnasts.

"Nobody was protecting us from being taken advantage of," Wieber said. "I was not protected, and neither were my teammates."

Wieber stated that she did not want the media to focus on her story.

"I am an Olympian, but I am also one of more than 140 women," she said. "Our pain is all the same."

The number of women who will speak has grown to 117 and is expected to last through next Tuesday.

 
Written by Amanda Turner    Tuesday, 16 January 2018 07:45    PDF Print
Dozens of Victims Prepare to Face Nassar in Court
(7 votes, average 3.57 out of 5)



The first day of the sentencing hearing of Larry Nassar for sexual assault begins Tuesday at 9 a.m. EST in Ingham County, Michigan, where dozens of his victims will be allowed to face the former USA Gymnastics doctor who is at the center of the largest known sex abuse scandal in sports history.

The first day of the sentencing hearing of Larry Nassar for sexual assault begins Tuesday at 9 a.m. EST in Ingham County, Michigan, where dozens of his victims will be allowed to face the former USA Gymnastics doctor who is at the center of the largest known sex abuse scandal in sports history.

Judge Rosemarie Aquilina, who was elected to the 30th Circuit Court for Ingham County in November 2008, is overseeing the sentencing. Judge Aquilina has allowed an extraordinary four-day hearing to allow any of Nassar's victims who filed complaints with Michigan State University to provide victim impact statements to the court. The women and girls will be given a chance to face Nassar personally or to send a letter to inform the judge of the devastation and suffering his assaults have caused them. It is unknown how many plan to attend the hearing in person, but there is no time limit imposed on any of the victims who wish to address the court.

Ingham County is the home of Michigan State University, where for nearly 20 years Nassar worked as an associate professor at the College of Osteopathic Medicine and as a team doctor for the athletics department, specifically the gymnastics team. He was also the team doctor for Geddert's Twistars USA Gymnastics Club, which has locations in Lansing, Ingham County, and in Dimondale, Eaton County. One of the victims was a family friend, who reported that her assaults began at age 6 years old.

Nassar, 54, was charged with 26 counts of aggravated sexual misconduct, but he pleaded guilty last November to 10 counts as part of a plea deal with Michigan Attorney-General Bill Schuette. Seven of the counts are related to assaults in Ingham County and three are from Eaton County, where he faces a second sentencing later this month. The Michigan Attorney-General's Office recommended a sentence of 40 to 125 years in prison for Nassar.

Assistant Attorney General Angela Povilaitis is the lead prosecutor in the case against Nassar. She runs a cold-case sexual assault project in Michigan and prosecutes cases of multi-victim and multijurisdictional sexual assault, such as the case against Nassar.

More than 130 women have gone public since September 2016 to report that Nassar, under the guise of osteopathic procedures, sexually assaulted them. The victims range from young girls, collegiate athletes, dancers, club gymnasts and five U.S. Olympians: Jamie Dantzscher, whose civil lawsuit in September 2016 helped finally bring down Nassar — and McKayla Maroney, Aly Raisman, Gabby Douglas and Simone Biles. Biles, the most decorated gymnast in U.S. history, went public on Monday to confirm she had also been among Nassar's victims, who could number in the thousands.

Even though national team member Maggie Nichols and her coach, Sarah Jantzi, informed USA Gymnastics of Nassar's assaults in June 2015, it was not until September 2016, when 2000 Olympian Jamie Dantzscher and former Kalamazoo club gymnast Rachael Denhollander came forward with the first public accusations, that Nassar was removed from practice and arrested. Nassar was fired from MSU in September 2016 and stripped of his medical license in April 2017. Denhollander is leading the federal civil suit against Michigan State University that has more than 130 co-plaintiffs suing the university, Nassar, USA Gymnastics and/or Twistars. MSU, USA Gymnastics and Twistars all have filed motions to dismiss, claiming they were not liable for Nassar's behavior.

Nassar has been in Ingham County Jail since December 2016, where he was denied bail after being indicted on federal charges related to child pornography. On December 7, 2017, a federal judge sentenced Nassar to the maximum of 60 years in prison on three counts (20 years each), to be served consecutively. Nassar, whose wife filed for divorce in January 2017, has appealed the sentence in forma pauperis, claiming to be destitute.

The proceedings will be streamed online by multiple outlets. The Law & Crime Network plans to stream the hearing online via Livestream.com.

People of the State of Michigan v. Lawrence Gerard Nassar: Ingham County

ChargesStatuteStatus
1Criminal sexual conduct – first degree (person under 13, defendant 17 years of age or older)750.520B2B Pleaded guilty November 22, 2017
2Criminal sexual conduct – first degree (person under 13, defendant 17 years of age or older)751.520B2B Pleaded guilty November 22, 2017
3Criminal sexual conduct – first degree (person under 13, defendant 17 years of age or older)752.520B2B Awaiting nolle prosequi (court will not prosecute)
4Criminal sexual conduct – first degree (person under 13, defendant 17 years of age or older)750.520B2B Awaiting nolle prosequi
5Criminal sexual conduct – first degree (relationship)750.520B1BPleaded guilty November 22, 2017
6Criminal sexual conduct – first degree (relationship)750.520B1BAwaiting nolle prosequi
7Criminal sexual conduct – first degree (relationship)750.520B1BAwaiting nolle prosequi
8Criminal sexual conduct – first degree (relationship)750.520B1BPleaded guilty November 22, 2017
9Criminal sexual conduct – third degree (person aged 13–15)750.520D1A Awaiting nolle prosequi
10Criminal sexual conduct – first degree (relationship)750.520B1BPleaded guilty November 22, 2017
11Criminal sexual conduct – third degree (person aged 13–15)750.520D1A Awaiting nolle prosequi
12Dismissed at or preliminary before hearingDismissed
13Dismissed at or preliminary before hearingDismissed
14Dismissed at or preliminary before hearingDismissed
15Dismissed at or preliminary before hearingDismissed
16Dismissed at or preliminary before hearingDismissed
17Dismissed at or preliminary before hearingDismissed
18Criminal sexual conduct – first degree (relationship)750.520B1BPleaded guilty November 22, 2017
19Criminal sexual conduct – third degree (person aged 13–15)750.520D1A Awaiting nolle prosequi
20Criminal sexual conduct – first degree (relationship)750.520B1BAwaiting nolle prosequi
21Criminal sexual conduct – third degree (person aged 13–15)750.520D1A Awaiting nolle prosequi
22Criminal sexual conduct – first degree (relationship)750.520B1BAwaiting nolle prosequi
23Criminal sexual conduct – third degree (person aged 13–15)750.520D1A Awaiting nolle prosequi
24Criminal sexual conduct – first degree (person under 13)750.520B1A Pleaded guilty November 22, 2017
25Criminal sexual conduct – first degree (person under 13)750.520B1A Awaiting nolle prosequi
26Criminal sexual conduct – first degree (person under 13)750.520B1A Awaiting nolle prosequi
 
Written by Amanda Turner    Monday, 15 January 2018 16:58    PDF Print
Biles 'Not Afraid to Tell My Story Anymore' of Sexual Abuse by Nassar
(13 votes, average 3.85 out of 5)

World and Olympic champion Simone Biles, the most successful gymnast the United States has ever produced, came forward Monday afternoon to reveal that she was also sexually abused by former USA Gymnastics team doctor Larry Nassar.

Biles, known equally for her big grin and tremendous power as an athlete, said she has struggled with going public with her allegations against Nassar. She joins fellows Olympians Jamie Dantzscher, McKayla Maroney, Aly Raisman and Gabby Douglas as among more than 140 women who come have forward to reveal the once highly respected doctor sexually assaulted them under the guise of treatment.


Simone Biles at the 2016 Olympic Games

"Please believe me when I say it was a lot harder to first speak those words out loud than it is now to put them on paper," Biles wrote on Twitter and Instagram, in a post with the hashtag #MeToo. "There are many reasons that I have been reluctant to share my story, but I know now it is not my fault."

Biles has been vocally supportive of her teammates who came forward but until Monday had kept her own story private. Like Raisman, Biles identified herself as a survivor of sexual assault, not a victim.

"I will not and should not carry the guilt that belongs to Larry Nassar, USAG, and others," she wrote.

Biles, who will turn 21 on March 14, won three consecutive world all-around titles from 2013 to 2015, dominating the sport of women's gymnastics. She capped off her streak with four gold medals at the 2016 Olympics in Rio: team gold for the United States and individual golds in the all-around, vault and floor exercise. After taking a break for a year, Biles recently returned to training at her family-owned World Champions Centre in Spring, Texas. In her note, Biles said she is traumatized at the thought of having to return to the Karolyi ranch, the U.S. national training center near Houston where Nassar allegedly had free reign to take gymnasts alone behind closed doors in order to assault them. USAG backed out of plans to buy the ranch after Nassar was first exposed in 2016, but the organization has made no concrete steps to replace the center, or even hold training camps at a temporary facility.

Raisman, who won the silver medal in the all-around behind Biles at the 2016 Olympics, tweeted a photo of the two holding hands in Rio along with a message of support.

"I am so proud of you," tweeted Raisman, the captain of the 2012 and 2016 U.S. women's Olympic teams. "You are incredible Simone. I stand with you. I am shaking reading your post. I know we will all get through this together."

After Maggie Nichols, Raisman and another gymnast were overheard at the Karolyi ranch in June 2015 discussing Nassar's "treatments" by Nichols coach, Sarah Jantzi, Jantzi and Nichols informed USA Gymnastics. USA Gymnastics sent a human resources consultant to interview Nichols and Raismanm instead of immediately alerting authorities. In a recent statement, USA Gymnastics claimed that statements from Nichols and Raisman "did not provide reasonable suspicion that sexual abuse had occurred," a stunning announcement that Raisman called "hurtful."

USA Gymnastics states that it reported Nassar to the FBI in July 2015. Nassar left USA Gymnastics in September 2015 but the allegations against him were not made public. He announced his retirement from USA Gymnastics and was allowed to continue practicing at Michigan State University, where he was an associate professor and team physician. He also continued to work at the Twistars Club near Detroit. Michigan State University, which had reportedly ignored repeated complaints about Nassar dating to at least 1997, is being sued alongside USA Gymnastics by more than 130 women.

USA Gymnastics, which has been accused of trying to silence gymnasts and their families from speaking about the Nassar scandal, has filed a motion to dismiss some of the lawsuits in Michigan, claiming it had no legal duty to notify MSU or Twistars of allegations against Nassar.

"An investigation must be done on @USAGym I am sick over this," Raisman tweeted Monday. "We must get to the bottom of how this disaster happened."

In November, Nassar pleaded guilty to 10 counts of sexual assault in two Michigan counties. The first of two sentencing hearings begins Tuesday in Ingham County and is expected to last through Friday. As part of his plea deal, the judge can consider other victims not included in the prosecution. As many as 100 women are expected to give victim impact statements, either in person or via letter to the court. Nassar was already sentenced to 60 years in federal prison for charges related to child pornography, discovered in September 2016 after women filed reports with the MSU Police Department.

Statement from Simone Biles

Most of you know me as a happy, giggly, and energetic girl. But lately...I've felt a bit broken and the more I try to shut off the voice in my head the louder it screams. I am not afraid to tell my story anymore.

I too am one of the many survivors that was sexually abused by Larry Nassar. Please believe me when I say it was a lot harder to first speak those words out loud than it is now to put them on paper. There are many reasons that I have been reluctant to share my story, but I know now it is not my fault.

It is not normal to receive any type of treatment from a trusted team physician and refer to it horrifyingly as the "special" treatment. This behavior is completely unacceptable, disgusting, and abusive, especially coming from someone whom I was TOLD to trust.

For too long I've asked myself, "Was I too naive? Was it my fault?" I now know the answer to those questions. No. No, it was not my fault. No, I will not and should not carry the guilt that belongs to Larry Nassar, USAG, and others.

It is impossibly difficult to relive these experiences and it breaks my heart even more to think that as I work towards my dream of competing in Tokyo 2020, I will have to continually return to the same training facility where I was abused.

After hearing the brave stories of my friends and other survivors, I know that this horrific experience does not define me. I am much more than this. I am unique, smart, talented, motivated, and passionate. I have promised myself that my story will be much greater than this and I promise all of you that I will never give up. I will compete with all of my heart and soul every time I step into the gym. I love this sport too much and I have never been a quitter. I won't let one man, and the others that enabled him, to steal my love and joy.

We need to know why this was able to take place for so long and to so many of us. We need to make sure something like this never happens again.

As I continue to work through the pain, I kindly ask everyone to respect my privacy. This is a process, and one that I need more time to work through.

XO, Simone Biles

 
Written by John Crumlish    Friday, 12 January 2018 14:15    PDF Print
World Medals Give Yeryomina 'Confidence In Myself And My Strengths'
(3 votes, average 3.67 out of 5)



The January/February 2018 issue of International Gymnast magazine includes a four-page feature on Russia's Yelena Yeryomina, who says that winning bronze in the all-around and silver on uneven bars at last fall's world championships in Montreal verified her talents and inspired her for future competitions.

The January/February 2018 issue of International Gymnast magazine includes a four-page feature on Russia's Yelena Yeryomina, who says that winning bronze in the all-around and silver on uneven bars at last fall's world championships in Montreal verified her talents and inspired her for future competitions.

"The medals that I earned give me confidence in myself and my strengths, and tell me that I can compete with the best gymnasts in the world," says Yeryomina, who trains under coaches Vera Kiryashova and Alexander Kiryashov in Pushkin, Saint Petersburg. "It is necessary to make my program more difficult and achieve stability."

Kiryashova says she immediately noticed Yeryomina's gymnastics potential when she entered the gym 12 years ago, but her intriguing character equally impresses her.

"The closer I got to Lena, the more I realized that her external traits showed a character, a rich inner world, a desire to be first," Kiryashova told IG. "She has everything to become an interesting person, both in life and sports."

Although her family name (Ерёмина) is pronounced Yer-YOM-in-a, she is indifferent to the variations in its transliteration outside Russia, including "Eremina" in FIG results as well as "Jeremina" in German, Dutch and Polish reports.

"In general, you correctly pronounce it 'Yeryomina,'" says Yeryomina, who will turn 17 on July 29. "But in my passport, I'm Eremina. In (most) other countries everyone abroad says Eremina and writes it, also. I do not pay attention to this, because they all talk about me!"

Read "Perfect Harmony," a four-page profile on Yeryomina and her coaches, in the January/February 2018 issue of International Gymnast magazine. To subscribe to the print and/or digital edition or order back issues, click here.

 
Written by Amanda Turner    Friday, 12 January 2018 05:45    PDF Print
Nassar Could Face Up to 125 Years in Prison
(4 votes, average 4.75 out of 5)



The Michigan Attorney General has recommended a county judge sentence Larry Nassar to 40 to 125 years in prison next week, in the first of two sentences to come for the former USA Gymnastics doctor who is behind the worst known case of sexual abuse in sports history.

The Michigan Attorney General has recommended a judge sentence Larry Nassar to 40 to 125 years in prison next week, in the first of two sentences to come for the former USA Gymnastics doctor who is behind the worst known case of sexual abuse in sports history.

Nassar, 54, pleaded guilty in November to 10 counts of sexual assault in Ingham County and Eaton County, Michigan, as part of a plea deal organized by Michigan Attorney General Bill Schuette. On Wednesday, the Michigan Attorney General's office filed a memorandum with its sentencing recommendation to the judge in Ingham County, recommending Nassar serve 40 to 125 years in prison.

Nassar will be sentenced on only 10 counts of assault that occurred in Ingham and Eaton counties represent only a small fraction of the number of assaults he has been accused of. Nassar reportedly told local police that he performed vaginal or anal penetration "thousands of times" while claiming it was a legitimate procedure. More than 130 women have filed civil lawsuits against him, USA Gymnastics, and his former full-time employer, Michigan State University. According to the Michigan Attorney General's office, 88 women are expected to provide victim impact statements over the four-day sentencing hearing, which Nassar agreed to as part of the plea agreement.

Nassar has never been arrested or charged with any crimes related to his sexual assaults on members of the U.S. national gymnastics team, including Olympians Jamie Dantzscher, Gabby Douglas, McKayla Maroney or Aly Raisman, and world championship team members Jeanette Antolin, Jessica Howard or Maggie Nichols. All seven women have come forward in the 16 months to confirm being assaulted by Nassar, which occurred at the U.S. national training center known as the Karolyi ranch in Texas, as well as competitions all over the country and world.

Nassar, who began working with USA Gymnastics (then the United States Gymnastics Federation) in 1986, was made the national team doctor in 1996. In 2014, he announced he would be resigning after the 2016 Olympic Games. He was quietly let go from USA Gymnastics in 2015 after Nichols' coach, Sarah Jantzi, overheard Nichols, Raisman and another gymnast at the Karolyi ranch discussing the "treatment" they received from Nassar. Despite statements from Jantzi, Nichols and Raisman to USA Gymnastics, he was not reported to the FBI for five weeks after USAG was first informed. In September 2015, Nassar publicly announced he was retiring from his position at USA Gymnastics to run for a position on the school board.

Nassar continued to practice and assault other women for more than a year after USA Gymnastics was informed, all the while the FBI failed to take any action against him. (The FBI has refused to comment on why it apparently did not seriously pursue the case.) Nichols, Raisman and their families have accused USA Gymnastics of pressuring them to keep quiet about the abuse during this time. Maroney, who is also suing USA Gymnastics, Michigan State University and the U.S. Olympic Committee, and her attorney have accused USA Gymnastics of forcing her to sign an illegal confidentiality agreement in order to receive a $1.25 million settlement in December 2016.

Despite repeated complaints that date to 1997 and its own internal investigation in 2014, Michigan State University took no action against Nassar, who worked as an associate professor and team doctor for the athletic department. During the 2014 investigation, Nassar was allowed to keep practicing, and he was eventually cleared by the university, which chose to believe his account and not that of his victim.

Rachael Denhollander, who was abused by Nassar as a 15-year-old club gymnast in 2000, spent more than 10 years independently pursuing her case after realizing she had been assaulted as a teen. When The Indianapolis Star published its "Out of Balance" series into USA Gymnastics' handling of sex abuse reports in the sport in August 2016, Denhollander went public with her story. Her account was published by The Indianapolis Star on September 12, the same date that Dantzscher's civil lawsuit in California against Nassar and USA Gymnastics was reported by the paper. Dozens of women then came forward, leading to Nassar's firing from MSU and subsequent arrest for assault.

In July, Nassar pleaded guilty to three counts related to child pornography found on his property during a police search on September 20, 2016. He was sentenced to 60 years in federal prison on those charges in December, a sentence he has appealed. He is unlikely to ever serve time in federal prison, given the lengthy sentence expected in Michigan, where he must serve his time first.

Despite the shocking details of Nassar's abuse, the large number of victims and the years his victims' complaints went ignored, the case has so far failed to match the scandal of Penn State University football coach Jerry Sandusky. The national media attention, public outrage, official investigations and criminal charges in the Nassar case pale in comparison to that of Sandusky, an assistant coach for the Penn State Nittany Lions, who was convicted of 45 counts of sexual abuse of boys from 1994 to 2009, and whose abuse was covered up for years by associates. Penn State paid more than $140 million to his victims and was fined $60 million by the NCAA and $10 million by the Big Ten Conference.

Schuette has stated he is considering opening an investigation into Michigan State University, which like USA Gymnastics continues to deny it ever covered up Nassar's abuse. So far there have been no announcements of investigations in Indiana, where USA Gymnastics has its headquarters, or in Texas, where Nassar spent more than 15 years treating gymnasts at the U.S. national training center in Houston, despite never being licensed to practice medicine in the state.

 


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