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Bross, Devyatovsky Claim Tyson American Cup
(11 votes, average 3.45 out of 5)

Rebecca Bross replaced a bad memory with a satisfying victory at the Tyson American Cup Saturday, avoiding the big mistake that cost her the all-around gold at the World Championships last October in London. Bross went four-for-four, with one near disaster on beam when her wolf turn finished on a knee instead of her foot. Bross scrambled to her feet and put the miscue behind her to secure the win. Along with the highest all-around score (60.550), Bross won uneven bars (15.300), beam (15.300) and floor (14.850).

"I am very proud of myself," Bross said. "I just wanted to go out and hit, and I did that. It's still early in the season, so I'm just ready for the rest of it now. It was amazing to watch girls from my gym win this event and then go out and see what they accomplished, and I just hope the string continues for me."

Vault winner Alexandra Raisman (15.150) placed second all-around with 58.900, well ahead of Venezuelan Jessica Lopez (56.500).

Ariella Kaeslin of Switzerland tied for second on vault with Bross (15.100) and finished fourth (56.050), ahead of Japan's Yuko Shintake (56.000). Elisabeth Seitz (Germany), Dominique Pegg (Canada) and Elsa Garcia (Mexico) completed the eight-gymnast field, respectively.

Russia's Maxim Devyatovsky took advantage of the misfortune of mid-meet leader Jonathan Horton to win the men's title with 90. 600. Horton cruised through the first four events, including the top rings score of 15.800, before coming undone at parallel bars. He missed a front uprise and later slipped on a giant swing and jumped off. He finished strong on high bar to second at 90.150.

"I am very, very glad to have won," Devyatovsky said. "It was important to me because in 1986, 24 years ago, an athlete (Alexei Tikhonkikh) from the former Soviet Union and my hometown was winner of the American Cup, and an American girl (Kristie Phillips) won at that competition, as well. So I am very glad!"

Said Horton: "I just slipped, and I should have paid more attention and re-chalked after Devyatovsky. It's ironic I messed up on parallel bars, because it is usually one of my best events."

Third place went to Winter Cup champion Chris Brooks (89.900), who was tops on floor (15.550), parallel bars (15.350) and high bar (15.800).

Defending champion Fabian Hambüchen (Germany) got off to a slow start but finished strong on high bar to finish fourth (89.00), ahead of world all-around silver medalist Daniel Keatings (Great Britain), who won pommel horse.

Koji Yamamuro (Japan), Jorge Hugo Giraldo (Colombia) and Flavius Koczi (Romania) completed the standings, respectively.

NOTE: On Friday night, Lexie Priessman (Cincinnati Gymnastics Academy) won the inaugural Nastia Liukin Supergirl Cup, over Kassandra Lopez (Gym World East) and Diandra Milliner (Folger's), respectively.

Comments (10)add comment

Suzanne Suzy said:

0
Rebecca Bross' knees
She's even turned-in just standing up in the photo above. Are you sure she's from WOGA?
 
March 06, 2010
Votes: +0

Shannon N said:

0
Age limit and Lexie Priessman
The age limit definitely needs to be eliminated. Lexie Priessman is so talented, and by August 2012, she's going to be a star. Unfortunately, she is not going to turn 16 until early 2013, missing the cut off to compete at the 2012 games by about a month. That is a travesty. There is no doubt in my mind that she is going to be one of the best gymnasts in the U.S. by then, yet she will not be able to compete at the Olympics. What a shame.
 
March 07, 2010
Votes: +1

LadyJane1976 said:

0
KEEP the age limit!
No, we should absolutely NOT eliminate the age limit. If we do that, artistic gymnastics will become nothing more than a tumbling contest for 11, 12, and 13-year-olds. Let's face it, children that age simply haven't had the time and training necessary to develop in terms of artistry and expression. If we want to have any hope of reviving ARTISTRY in our sport, we should keep the age limit.
 
March 07, 2010
Votes: +0

Stella said:

0
Age limit
Artistry has nothing to do with age. There was way more artistry in the sport when 14 year olds were competing in the Olympics.
 
March 07, 2010
Votes: +0

PanchitoPaz said:

0
RE: Age Limit
I agree with Stella that artistry has nothing to do with age.

If we want to revive artistry, then we should re-evaluate the scoring system and heavily reward gymnasts that show great artistry, eg. provide more points or have a separate score/panel solely dedicated to artistic impression/composition (as seen in other sports such as Sport Aerobics and Figure Skating).

That way regardless of age, those gymnasts showing great artistry and composition on floor/beam/bars will be heavily rewarded.
 
March 07, 2010
Votes: +0

LadyJane1976 said:

0
...
Artistry has EVERYTHING to do with age. It's called experience and training.
 
March 08, 2010
Votes: +1

Jason said:

Jason
...
Artistry has NOTHING to do with age. If this in fact true then why was Nastia Liukin artistic at 13 and 14? (Look at some of the Russian juniors even (the Mustafina girls, Nabieva, et al) And The Same with Khorkina? I reme,ber seeing her when she was 13 and 14 and was way more polished than some of the older girls.... And on the flip side, according to your argument of age = artistry, then why arent ALL older gymnasts artistic? It has everything to do with each individual gymnast and nothing to do with age. I think the age rule stinks. Change the judging and reward more for artistry and even the "so called" 11, and 12 year old power tumblers wont win. If they are artistic at 14 and can get the scores, they shouldnt be held back from World or Olympic championships.
 
March 08, 2010
Votes: +2

LadyJane1976 said:

0
...
Those gymnasts are exceptions to the rule, not the norm. This sport is called women's gymnastics for a reason. Anyone who cares about the artistry of this sport will want to keep some sort of age limit in place.
 
March 08, 2010
Votes: -1

p-rock said:

0
...
I agree that age has little to do with artistry. As a former athlete and coach, I've learned that you are either born with innate artistry or you're not. I think you can improve your artistic impression over time but you can't teach natural talent for expression.
 
March 08, 2010
Votes: +3

erin said:

0
...
there should not be an age limit because age has nothing to do with talent
look at Jordyn Wieber she could have been in the olympics three years ago
she is already beating olympians
 
July 27, 2010
Votes: +0

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